Faith Archive

A “double-minded” quiz

“Scene 1: It’s ten o’clock on Sunday morning. Sadie bounces from person to person as church is about to begin. She hugs everyone and smiles. She races toward the door when she sees Corrie, the youth pastor’s wife, who is planning this weekend’s youth retreat. She hugs her and tells her how “psyched” she is for it and that she’s really ready for a “God encounter.” She thanks her for planning it and races off to hug another needy heart. Sadie has a strong spiritual gift of mercy. She knows it and she loves using it.

Scene 2: It’s ten o’clock on Sunday night.
Sadie is parked in front of her laptop where she’s been for the last hour. Right now she’s I.M.-ing with Jake. First they talk about how “face” Corrie is. Then, the conversation gets a little sexual. Jake says he’d like to take her virginity away from her, but he’s just not sure. After all, she’s the pastor’s daughter. What would he think? Sadie says it’s none of her dad’s business.

Will the real Sadie please stand up?” (Lies Young Women Believe, 103).

Nancy Talks About Discretion

Nancy helps us understand that what we say matters! I know that this can be a difficult truth, but it is so important for us to grasp. In what way have you seen the destructive power of words in your own life? Do you sense that the Lord is asking you to change a specific way that you communicate with others? I’d love to hear about it.

I am my own authority

This week I want to dig into a lie that honestly, tends to be rather unpopular among young women (and young men). To be honest, it is an area where I continue to struggle. It is also an area where believing lies can be particularly disastrous.

Are you ready for it? I think we should talk about authority.

What is true friendship?

I can remember it like it was yesterday. I was in the seventh grade. I had just dialed in the combination to my locker when an avalanche occurred. Someone had filled my locker to the brim with hygiene products. When I opened the locker, it triggered the avalanche and several bottles of soap and shampoo spilled out into the hallway. As if that wasn’t embarrassing enough, the culprits had included a note that pointed out that I “stunk” and suggested that I use the “gifts” they’d given me to take a shower. I was humiliated. I wanted to run. I wanted to hide. I swore I was never coming back to seventh grade.

It turns out that the shampoo bandits were my “friends.” While it’s true that the hormonal changes of puberty may have left me less than shower fresh, their tactic for dealing with it was less than friendly. In fact, it was down right mean.